Negligence in Louisiana Personal Injury Law

Negligence occurs when the person’s conduct falls below an objective standard of care and that substandard conduct results in injury to another. The Louisiana negligence law specifically states, “every act whatever of man that causes damage to another obliges him by whose fault it happened to repair it.”

Negligence plays a part in almost every personal injury case, including motor vehicle accidents. Therefore, understanding negligence is essential to Louisiana personal injury law. If you are injured in a car accident, Louisiana’s duty-risk negligence analysis determines who is responsible for the damages suffered. Proving negligence using the duty-risk analysis consists of the following components:
1. Cause in-fact
2. Duty
3. Scope of duty
4. Breach
5. Damages

Cause in Fact

The cause in-fact element contains two inquiries: the “but for” and substantial factor tests. Specifically, we look to whether the accident would occur absent the driver’s negligent conduct and/or whether the driver’s negligent conduct was a substantial factor in causing the harm. For example, if a driver is texting while operating his vehicle and fails to stop at a red light, rear ending another vehicle, we know that “but for” his texting and driving, he would have stopped at the red light, avoiding the accident. Likewise, the driver’s texting and driving are a substantial factor in causing harm to the driver he rear-ended.

Duty

The general rule for duty is an objective reasonable person standard. This is the level of care owed to the victim of a car accident by the defendant. Simply put, the “duty” element requires that the defendant owe a legal duty to the plaintiff to act with reasonable care so one party does not physically injure others.

Scope of Duty

Scope of the duty questions whether this defendant should be responsible for the injury to this plaintiff in this case. For this element, the law looks to foreseeability, ease of association, intervening/superseding causes, and certain policy factors. The analysis is as follows:

1. Was the risk foreseeable as it pertains to this particular plaintiff? Referring back to the texting and driving example, it is undoubtedly foreseeable that texting and driving will result in a car accident.
2. How easily is this injury associated with the negligent act? From our earlier understanding, we are aware that the injury would not occur if the driver did not text and drive. Therefore, the potential neck and back pain is easily
associated with being rear ended by distracted driver.
3. Intervening/Superseding Causes are acts that occur between the negligent act and the resulting harm. For example, getting hit by a car on the highway while changing a tire after an auto accident versus getting struck by a
lightning bolt while changing a tire after an auto accident. Getting struck by a lightning bolt is not a foreseeable or probable event, therefore, it would be considered a superseding cause and the defendant is not liable for those
injuries to the plaintiff. However, the defendant is liable for injuries specifically caused by the car accident.
4. Pitre Policy factors – These factors are used to determine whether the defendant’s actions are in the scope of his or her duty to the plaintiff.
a. The need for compensation of losses.
b. The historical development of precedents.
c. The moral aspects of the defendant’s conduct.
d. The efficient administration of the law.
e. The deterrence of future harmful conduct.
f. The capacity to bear and distribute losses.

Breach of Duty

Breach of the duty refers to whether the defendant fell below the objective standard of care. Here, we look to whether the defendant’s conduct was “unreasonable.” For example, driving under the influence of alcohol is unreasonable. A
person who drives under the influence of alcohol and texts or talks on the phone while driving falls below an objective reasonable standard of care, thus, breaching their duty as a driver on the state’s roads and highways.

Actual Damages

Finally, a plaintiff must prove actual damage by showing personal injury damages, out of pocket damages such as medical expenses or lost wages, or by showing damages to property. If either of these exist, the plaintiff will likely recover compensation from a negligent defendant who caused a car accident.

Comparative Fault and Negligence

Louisiana is a pure comparative fault state. When an accident occurs, fault is assigned to each and every party involved, including the plaintiff. For example, Anne is texting and driving and hits Bob. However, Bob’s brake lights are broken and other drivers can’t tell when his vehicle is coming to a stop. In this situation, the law assigns a
percentage of fault to Anne for her negligent texting and driving, and Bob for his negligent failure to repair his brake lights.

The factors to be considered when assigning fault were enumerated in Watson v. State Farm Fire and Casualty Insurance Co. The Watson factors include:

1. Whether the conduct resulted from inadvertence or involved an awareness of the danger.
2. How great was the risk created by the conduct?
3. The significance of what was sought by the conduct.
4. The capacities of the actors, whether superior or inferior.
5. Extenuating circumstances which might require the actor to proceed in haste, without proper thought; and
6. The relationship between the fault/negligent conduct and the harm to the plaintiff.

Your Personal Injury Claim

Hiring an attorney experienced in auto accident reconstruction and fault determination is crucial in determining potential recovery. Many accidents and injuries are the result of someone else’s negligence, but it is important that the injured party be aware of his role, if any, in the accident as well. The attorneys at Gaynell Williams, LLC are dedicated advocates who pursue full and just compensation for clients who have been injured in auto accidents. If you are injured in an auto accident, contact our office to explore your legal options.

At the Law Office of Gaynell Williams LLC, we have attorneys readily available to assist after you are involved in an automobile accident. Our attorneys will ensure that you receive fair compensation for any personal injuries or property damage that you sustained, and appropriate medical attention to alleviate injuries after an automobile
accident.

If you have been injured in a car accident as a result of the negligence of another driver, or if you have suffered property damage due to the negligence of another driver, contact Gaynell Williams today at (504) 302-2462 for a free, no obligation consultation. Evenings and weekend sessions are available by appointment. We will work around
your schedule. New Orleans personal injury lawyer Gaynell Williams, L.L.C. has offices in Gretna and Downtown New Orleans (by appointment only) to serve victims of auto accidents, work related accidents, medical malpractice, and wrongful death.

This information has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please consult your attorney in connection with any specific situation under federal and/or Louisiana law and the applicable state or local laws that may impose additional obligations on you and/or your family member. © 2020 Gaynell Williams LLC Attorney at Law L.L.C. has offices in Gretna and Downtown New Orleans (by appointment only) to serve victims of auto accidents, work related accidents, medical malpractice, and wrongful death.

By |2020-02-17T15:22:22-05:00February 17th, 2020|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Negligence in Louisiana Personal Injury Law

Personal Injury Cases – What is Louisiana’s “No Pay, No Play” Law and How Might it Affect My Personal Injury Claim?

Several states, including the state of Louisiana, have passed laws with “no pay, no play” rules. These laws limit the amount uninsured motorists can recover when they are injured by insured motorists. When a driver suffers an injury or property damage in a car accident in Louisiana, they can file a claim with the other driver’s insurance company to obtain compensation for their losses. Louisiana’s “no pay, no play” law, passed in 2011, may prevent drivers who are uninsured or underinsured from collecting on a small insurance claim if they are involved in a motor vehicle accident. Specifically, the law states “[t]here shall be no recovery for the first fifteen thousand dollars of bodily
injury and no recovery for the first twenty-five thousand dollars of property damage based on any cause or right of action arising out of a motor vehicle accident, for such injury or damages occasioned by an owner or operator of a motor vehicle involved in such accident who fails to own or maintain compulsory motor vehicle liability security.”

An Example of No Pay No Play Insurance Laws in Action
This means that for personal injury claims against the negligent driver and their insurance company, the injured driver who does not have car insurance will not be able to recover the first $15,000 against the insurance company. But if the amount of your injuries is greater than $15,000, you can recover an amount in excess of $15,000. For
example, if your personal injury damages amount to $250,000, you will be able to recover $235,000 ($250,000 – $15,000).

Also, if the at-fault driver does not have insurance, the costs of vehicle repairs and medical treatment will fall on the injured driver. Thus, it is important for the injured driver to have proper insurance in the event that the negligent driver does not have sufficient insurance.

General Insurance Requirement for Louisiana Drivers
To legally drive in Louisiana, drivers must have a valid driver’s license and a valid auto insurance policy to legally drive in Louisiana. The uninsured driver could be required to pay some of the expenses out of pocket, which can be rather expensive depending on the extent of the damages. However, the law only requires that drivers carry minimum liability insurance (i.e., you are not required to purchase full or comprehensive coverage.) The minimum car insurance requirements in Louisiana are as follows:

1. $15,000 per person for bodily injury liability;
2. $30,000 per accident for bodily injury liability; and
3. $25,000 for property damage liability.

Exceptions to Louisiana’s No Pay, No Play Law

Fortunately, Louisiana’s “no pay, no play” does not apply to all car accidents. The following are exceptions to the law:

1. The other driver is cited for operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol or another mind-altering substance and later convicted. Since the other driver needs to be convicted for this exception to apply, it is particularly important that someone familiar with the legal system tracks the progress of the case.

2. The other driver intentionally caused the accident.

3. The other driver flees from the scene of the accident.

4. At the time of the accident, the other driver is in furtherance of the
commission of a felony offense. Louisiana recognizes that drivers who can’t
afford insurance should not be responsible for paying bodily injuries or
property damages if you were hit by someone engaged in a criminal act.

5. Your vehicle was legally parked at the time of the accident. The state of Louisiana recognizes that even if you don’t have car insurance, or you don’t have enough insurance as required by state law, you shouldn’t be responsible
for paying for any bodily injury or property damages if your car is legally parked at the time of an accident.

6. Your vehicle is registered in another state. Louisiana has strict insurance laws, but it recognizes it can’t enforce these laws on residents of other states. If you are an out of state driver whose state does not require minimum
coverage and someone hits your car while you are in Louisiana, the “no pay, no play” law does not apply.

7. The law does not apply to a passenger’s claim unless the passenger is a co-owner of the uninsured car. If you are riding in a car with a friend or family member who is uninsured, Louisiana recognizes this is not your fault and
does not apply the “no pay, no play” law to passengers of uninsured or underinsured car accidents.

Besides Louisiana, other states that have laws similar to Louisiana’s “no pay, no play” law. Those states are Alaska, California, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, North Dakota, Oklahoma and Oregon. In many of these states, the law only applies to non-economic damages like pain and suffering. Louisiana is one of the only
states where the law applies to economic damages (i.e., vehicle repairs and medical treatment). Louisiana established the “no pay, no play” law in an attempt to reduce the car insurance rates for legal drivers because insurance companies raised the rates to cover drivers who were driving uninsured or underinsured. Insurance companies believed that when an insured driver is involved in an accident with an uninsured driver,
insurance companies lose a large amount of money. Louisiana countered this issue of the perceived rising insurance costs by instituting the statute. Thus, you must ensure that you carry minimum liability insurance and it does not lapse from missing payments.

At the Law Office of Gaynell Williams LLC, we have attorneys readily available to assist after you are involved in an automobile accident. Our attorneys will seek fair compensation for any personal injuries or property damage that you sustained, and appropriate medical attention to alleviate injuries after an automobile accident.

If you have been injured in a car accident as a result of the negligence of another driver, or if you have suffered property damage due to the negligence of another driver, contact Gaynell Williams today at (504) 302-2462 for a free, no obligation consultation. Evenings and weekend sessions are available by appointment. We will work around
your schedule. New Orleans personal injury lawyer Gaynell Williams, L.L.C. has offices in Gretna and Downtown New Orleans (by appointment only) to serve victims of auto accidents, work related accidents, medical malpractice, and wrongful death. This information has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please consult your attorney in connection with any specific situation under federal and/or Louisiana law and the applicable state or local laws that may impose additional obligations on you and/or your family member. © 2020 Gaynell Williams LLC Attorney at Law.

By |2020-02-17T15:15:59-05:00February 17th, 2020|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Personal Injury Cases – What is Louisiana’s “No Pay, No Play” Law and How Might it Affect My Personal Injury Claim?

Things to do After an Automobile Accident

The average number of car accidents in the United States is 6 million. Nearly 1.25 million people
die in these accidents, which is an average of 3,287 deaths per day. Fortunately, there are personal
injury attorneys to assist injured persons immediately after an automobile accident. The following are
things you should do after you have been involved in an automobile accident:

1. Stop. If you are involved in an accident, even a minor one, and drive away from the scene,
you may be criminally charged with a “hit and run.” For this reason, it is important to stop
immediately after an automobile accident occurs. Hit-and-run driving is the intentional
failure of the driver of a vehicle involved in or causing any accident, to stop such vehicle at
the scene of the accident, to give his identity, and to render reasonable aid. Under the hit
and run statute, "accident" means an incident or event resulting in damage to property or
injury to person.

2. Remove your vehicle from the roadway. After an automobile accident, it is important that
you remove your vehicle from the roadway, if it is operable. Louisiana state law requires
motorists to move their vehicles off of the road for the safety of other motorists and those
involved in the motor vehicle accident.

3. Call the police. Even if there aren’t any serious or life-threatening injuries, you may need a
police report to file a claim with your insurance company.

4. Take pictures. You should take pictures of any visible damage to your vehicle and visible
injuries to your person. Pictures provide “proof” of the damage that has occurred as a result
of the automobile accident. If you face adversity regarding who caused the accident or
whether you sustained any injuries, the pictures will prevent any “he say, she say.” It is also
a good idea to take pictures of all cars involved in the accident as well as the scene around
the accident. For example, you might want to take photos of the nearest intersection, stop
signs, road signs, and speed limit signs.

5. Take photos of people involved in the accident. It is also important to take photos of
people involved in the accident as well as other people at the scene of the accident. These
people may provide information that may be important to your case in the event that you
decide to file a claim.

6. Take detailed notes. If possible, take detailed notes about the accident. This includes the
time of day, the weather, the condition of the roadway, other injuries that you witness,
things that people say. Everything is important after an accident. You will never know until
later the importance of information available at the time of an accident. This information
could be critical to your case. If you do not have pen and paper, write down this information
in your phone. Send yourself a text or send a text to another person. The key is to obtain as
much information as possible after the accident.

7. Exchange information. If police officers do not respond to an automobile accident, it is
important to exchange contact information from the other driver as well as any witnesses
present at the scene. Obtain a photograph of the driver’s license of the other driver as well.
And write down what you hear other people say at the scene. Get the names, addresses,
phone numbers, and email addresses (if possible) of all people who are willing to provide
this information. Most people who witness an automobile accident will be willing to discuss
the things that they saw, heard, or witnesses.

8. Seek medical attention. Injuries caused by an automobile accident are not always
immediately apparent. Even in accidents involving minor impact, injuries may be sustained
to your spine and the soft tissue throughout your person. Therefore, you should seek
immediate medical attention to alleviate injuries both apparent and non-apparent.

At the Law Office of Gaynell Williams LLC, we have are attorneys readily available to assist after
you are involved in an automobile accident. Our attorneys will ensure that you receive fair
compensation for any personal injuries or property damage that you sustained, and appropriate
medical attention to alleviate injuries after an automobile accident.

If you have been injured in a car accident as a result of the negligence of another driver, or if you
have suffered property damage due to the negligence of another driver, contact Gaynell Williams today
at (504) 302-2462 for a free, no obligation consultation. Evenings and weekend sessions are available by
appointment. We will work around your schedule. New Orleans personal injury lawyer Gaynell Williams,
L.L.C. has offices in Gretna and Downtown New Orleans (by appointment only) to serve victims of auto
accidents, work related accidents, medical malpractice, and wrongful death.

This information has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and
should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please consult your attorney in connection with any
specific situation under federal and/or Louisiana law and the applicable state or local laws that may
impose additional obligations on you and/or your family member. © 2019 Gaynell Williams LLC Attorney
at Law.

By |2020-01-04T07:19:44-05:00January 4th, 2020|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Things to do After an Automobile Accident

Heat of Passion Manslaughter in Louisiana

Most people are familiar with heat of passion manslaughter. But there are actually three other types of manslaughter that most people are not familiar with. The other three types of manslaughter are felony manslaughter, misdemeanor manslaughter, and resisting arrest manslaughter. This article will discuss heat of passion manslaughter in Louisiana. Subsequent blogs will discuss the other three types of manslaughter in Louisiana.

The Louisiana Criminal Code defines manslaughter as:

(1) A homicide which would be murder under either Article 30 (first degree murder) or Article 30.1 (second degree murder), but the offense is committed in sudden passion or heat of blood immediately caused by provocation sufficient to deprive an average person of his self-control and cool reflection. Provocation shall not reduce a homicide to manslaughter if the jury finds that the offender’s blood had actually cooled, or that an average person’s blood would have cooled, at the time the offense was committed; or

(2) A homicide committed, without any intent to cause death or great bodily harm.

(a) When the offender is engaged in the perpetration or attempted perpetration of any felony not enumerated in Article 30 or 30.1, or of any intentional misdemeanor directly affecting the person; or

(b) When the offender is resisting lawful arrest by means, or in a manner, not inherently dangerous, and the circumstances are such that the killing would not be murder under Article 30 or 30.1.

B. Whoever commits manslaughter shall be imprisoned at hard labor for not more than forty years. However, if the victim killed was under the age of ten years, the offender shall be imprisoned at hard labor, without benefit of probation or suspension of sentence, for not less than ten years nor more than forty years. [La. R.S. 14:31]

Heat of Passion Manslaughter

Heat of passion manslaughter is a homicide which would-be second-degree murder, but the crime is committed in sudden passion or heat of blood immediately caused by provocation sufficient to deprive an average person of his self-control and cool reflection. A heat of passion manslaughter is an intentional killing, but at the time of the intentional killing, the defendant’s provocation resulted in impulsive and uncontrolled action that resulted in a death. This impulsive action does not excuse the killing and the defendant is not completely exonerated. But because human beings are frail individuals, the law allows a defendant under these circumstances to be charged or convicted of a crime that is less serious than first degree murder or second-degree murder.

For the prosecution to convict a defendant of heat of passion manslaughter, the prosecution must prove the following: (1) that the defendant intentionally killed a human being, (2) that the killing was committed in sudden passion or heat of blood, (3) immediately caused by provocation sufficient to deprive an average person of his self-control and cool reflection, (4) that the defendant’s blood had not cooled at the time of the killing, and (5) that an average person’s blood would not have cooled at the time of the killing.

Things that have been held to be sufficient provocation of a defendant to be able to use the heat of passion manslaughter statute to reduce a charge from first degree murder or second murder are: (1) a spouse seeing an act of adultery between their spouse and another person; (2) a severe blow on the head; (3) slapping the defendant during an argument; and (4) physical threats.

Several Louisiana legal decisions have held that “catching a spouse in the act” can be sufficient provocation. Provocation has also been found when one spouse saw the other spouse preparing for the act of adultery with another. But, in Louisiana, courts have not generally found a boyfriend or girlfriend to be provoked at the sight of seeing their lover with another person. In one Louisiana case, the defendant killed his gay lover. The Court did not accept the defendant’s argument that his discovery of his lover’s infidelity caused sufficient provocation to reduce his killing from second degree murder to manslaughter because the defendant and the victim were not married and because the victim’s conduct was not adultery as defined in Louisiana. The Court said in State v. Jack, 596 So. 2d 323, 326 (La. Ct. App. 1992) that “Adultery, bodily harm, threats and any other action of the victim may be considered by the jury.”). And because the defendant and the victim were not married, he was properly convicted of
second-degree murder instead of heat of passion manslaughter.

Additionally, provocation is not usually found when one spouse simply has a hunch that the other spouse is committing adultery. For provocation to be found, the cheating spouse must be caught “in flagrante delicto,” that is, in the midst of sexual activity.

In another Louisiana case, the defendant was charged with first degree murder after he killed his wife and her lover after they walked into a bar together where he was drinking with friends. After being convicted of two count of second-degree murder, the defendant argued that he should have been found guilty of heat of passion manslaughter because his wife admitted to the adultery at the bar and told him graphically about how good her boyfriend was in bed. The defendant said that when he heard these words, that he “just lost my head” and felt as though he was “kicked in the stomach,” and that he had “never felt anything like that before.” However, because the defendant did not catch his wife “in the act,” the court found that he was guilty of second-degree murder and not manslaughter. State v. Thorne, 633 So. 2d 773 (La. App. 5 Cir. 1994).

In another heat of passion manslaughter case dealing with a fight, the court found the defendant guilty of heat of passion manslaughter when the victim punched the defendant, threw him against a metal rail, knocked him to the ground and held him in a stranglehold. In order to free himself, defendant pulled a knife and stabbed the victim. In this case, State v. Lombard, 486 So. 2d 106 (La.1986), the Louisiana Supreme Court reduced the defendant’s second-degree murder conviction to manslaughter, reasoning that such sudden provocation would have deprived a reasonable man of self-control.

If you’ve been accused of a crime, contact Gaynell Williams today at (504) 302-2462 for a free, no obligation consultation. Evenings and weekend sessions are available by appointment. We will work around your schedule. New Orleans criminal lawyer Gaynell Williams, L.L.C. has offices in Gretna and Downtown New Orleans by appointment only to serve victims of auto accidents, work related accidents, medical malpractice, and wrongful death.

This information has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please consult your attorney in connection with any specific situation under federal and/or Louisiana law and the applicable state or local laws that may impose additional obligations on you and/or your family member. © 2019 Gaynell Williams LLC Attorney at Law.

By |2019-12-08T13:44:52-05:00December 8th, 2019|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Heat of Passion Manslaughter in Louisiana

HOW LONG DOES A PERSON HAVE TO BRING A PERSONAL INJURY LAWSUIT IN LOUISIANA?

HOW LONG DOES A PERIOD HAVE TO FILE A PERSONAL INJURY LAWSUIT IN LOUISIANA?

When a person is injured in an accident due to the fault of another, whether it be negligence, intentional or reckless conduct, that person is entitled to recover damages. Personal injury accidents arise from auto accidents, motorcycle accidents, truck accidents, slip & falls, construction site accidents, drownings, boat accidents, dog bites, head injuries, brain injuries, neck injuries, spine injuries, and loss of a limb.

There are two types of damages, general damages and special damages, that an injured person can recover. General damages are those damages like pain and suffering that you cannot calculate, the damages that have no specific dollar value. These damages are determined by the jury based on how seriously the jury thinks that the person is injured. General damages also include emotional distress, lessened quality of life, loss of consortium, and psychological damages.

Then there are special damages. These are the economic or “out-of-pocket” damages that the injured person sustained as a result of the accident. These damages include property damages, lost wages, loss of earning capacity, medical bills and prescription bills. Special damages can be assigned a specific dollar value. For example, if the damage to the injured person’s car is $10,000, that is one aspect of special damages. Furthermore, if the doctor’s bill for a back surgery or a knee surgery is $25,000, then these are special damages. Special damages or economic or out-of-pocket may also be recovered by the injured person (or plaintiff) in a personal injury action.

Lawsuits for personal injury must be brought within a specific time after the injury. If the plaintiff fails to bring the lawsuit within this specific time, he may be prevented from receiving any money damages for his injuries. In Louisiana, this period of time is called the prescriptive period. In other states, this period of time is called the “statute of limitations.” Although the terms are different, they both mean the specific time that an injured person has to bring a lawsuit against another person or company.
Louisiana is different from other states in the United States because it is the only civil law jurisdiction in the United States. Louisiana’s civil law legal system is based on two civil law countries, Spain and France.

Statute of Limitations for Louisiana Personal Injury Claims

Medical Malpractice Claims

Medical malpractice claims in Louisiana must be brought within one year of the injury. The rules governing the time within which a medical malpractice action can be brought are set forth in La. R.S. 9:5628(A), which provides in pertinent part:
No action for damages for injury or death against any physician …. whether based upon tort, or breach of contract, or otherwise, arising out of patient care shall be brought unless filed within one year from the date of the alleged act, omission or neglect or within one year from the date of discovery of the alleged act, omission or neglect; however, even as to claims filed within one year from the date of such discovery, in all events such claims shall be filed at the latest within a period of three years from the date of the alleged act, omission or neglect. (Emphasis added)
La. R.S. 9:5628(A) means that in an action against a physician under the medical malpractice act, the plaintiff has one year from the alleged act, omission or neglect or one year from discovery of the alleged act, omission or neglect within which to bring an action.
But the second period of time that must be applied to all actions under the medical malpractice act is “peremptive” in nature and may not be interrupted or suspended. No action may be brought once three years have passed after the alleged act of malpractice under any circumstances…

Personal Injury Lawsuits

The prescriptive period applicable for personal injury lawsuits is one year. That means that a person has one year after an injury to bring a lawsuit. In other words, a party who has received a personal injury because of the fault of another can sue that person or company for up to one year later, or until the first anniversary of the date of the incident. If the lawsuit is not filed by that time, the plaintiff is forever barred from suing the part at fault. So it is important to consult a lawyer so that your rights are protected.

The time to bring a lawsuit in Louisiana is much shorter than some other states. For example, in the state of Mississippi, an injured party usually has three years to bring a personal injury lawsuit.

When you or a loved one have been injured in an accident, you may be wondering who you can turn to in your time of need. At the Law Office of Gaynell Williams, L.L.C., we have the experience you need to fight for the compensation you deserve for not only the costs you’ve incurred, but for the pain and suffering you and your family have been made to endure. We will search for every possible source of financial restitution, be it through insurance settlements, personal injury claims, arbitration, mediation or litigation. Our goal is to see to it that the financial costs you have been burdened with after a serious accident are covered completely, so you can focus on what is most important – healing. Call (504) 302-2462.

This information has been provided for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be construed to constitute legal advice. Please consult your attorney in connection with any specific situation under federal and/or Louisiana law and the applicable state or local laws that may impose additional obligations on you and/or your family member. © 2019 Gaynell Williams LLC Attorney at Law.

By |2019-10-04T21:44:54-05:00October 4th, 2019|Uncategorized|Comments Off on HOW LONG DOES A PERSON HAVE TO BRING A PERSONAL INJURY LAWSUIT IN LOUISIANA?
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